Review: Sweat, Donmar Warehouse

Set in the pre-Trump days (remember those?), Sweat tells the story of a forgotten town in the US and the decline of the so-called American Dream. Writer Lynn Nottage spent just over two years speaking with the real-life residents of Reading, Pennsylvania, one of the poorest towns in America, and used the knowledge gathered to... Continue Reading →

Review: Anomaly, Old Red Lion Theatre

Over the past year there’s been a big focus on the #MeToo movement following allegations against powerful men in Hollywood including Harvey Weinstein and Kevin Spacey. Now WildChild Productions’ latest play Anomaly offers a fresh perspective by telling the story of the perpetrator’s family – the women who are left behind to pick up the... Continue Reading →

Top 10 London Theatre of 2018

2018 has been a bumper year for London theatre, with a number of productions taking the capital by storm. Though unfortunately I didn’t get round to seeing everything I wanted to (I still regret not catching the Young Vic’s Twelfth Night and Misty at the Trafalgar Studios) and my experience of regional theatre was limited... Continue Reading →

Review: Romeo and Juliet, Barbican Centre

Romeo and Juliet arrives at the Barbican as part of the Royal Shakespeare Company’s London residency. Directed by Erica Whyman, Shakespeare’s classic story of love and rivalry is given a contemporary makeover that results in an energetic and urgent adaptation. Although written over four centuries ago, this production feels chillingly relevant, with members of rival... Continue Reading →

Welcome…? Review

Performed at the Bridewell Theatre in an enticing lunchtime slot, Welcome…? is a ground-breaking play that seeks to challenge the narrative around out-of-work pregnant female actors and is the first theatrical production in the UK to star two pregnant performers. Written by Lily Lowe-Myers in just three weeks and staring both Lowe-Myers and Robyn Cooper,... Continue Reading →

Review: Mrs Dalloway, Arcola Theatre

Adapting Mrs Dalloway for the stage is no easy feat, given that this classic novel, arguably Virginia Woolf’s most famous undertaking is renowned for using a stream of consciousness technique to get right to the heart of the characters’ thoughts and emotions. Thankfully this latest adaptation by Hal Coase, performed at the Arcola Theatre, meets... Continue Reading →

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